<![CDATA[Vertical city - news]]>Thu, 22 Nov 2018 01:59:59 -0800Weebly<![CDATA[Can vertical city be the cure to "big city malaise"?]]>Wed, 02 Nov 2016 07:00:00 GMThttp://verticalcity.org/news/can-vertical-city-be-the-cure-to-big-city-malaise
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Editor Note: the original article is written in Chinese & was published on China Youth News.
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Speakers and guests at the 2016 Vertical City Conference. Photo Credit: J.A.O. Design International

​Kenneth King, an 83 years old Chinese American architect, may be doing something that can "save the world"... Vertical City, literally refers to cities that are built vertically, in which elevator is the main transportation means instead of automobiles. People can travel from point A to point B in the city in 15 minutes. Land will be released for agriculture and greenery because cities are built vertically instead of horizontally... Citizens will no longer be sitting in commute every day, the real estate market will cool down, and the air will be much cleaner... 

"In China, especially in megacity regions like JingJinJi, where overpopulation and pollution have become pressing issues, Vertical City could become a reality and a solution." said Kenneth King, at the recently closed 2016 Vertical City Conference in Tianjin, China.
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<![CDATA[The 1st Vertical City Conference  Tianjin, China, October 13 - 14]]>Tue, 13 Sep 2016 22:34:33 GMThttp://verticalcity.org/news/the-1st-vertical-city-conference-tianjin-china-october-13-14
After months of hard work and collaboration, the Vertical City team is proud to announce that the 1st Vertical City Conference will be held in Tianjin, China this fall.

​This conference will explore how the Vertical City concept can contribute to the development of metropolitan areas and mega metropolitan areas such as Jing Jin Ji in China.  
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​Jing = Beijing


Jin = Tianjin

Ji = Hebei Province

​This 2-day event will include 10 presentations and 3 panel discussions. All speakers are accomplished professionals such as Kenneth King, architect; Chien Chung Pei, architect; Dennis Poon, engineer; Richard Register, ecocity theorist; Daniel Safarik, architect and journalist; Karl Schöllkopf, engineer; Lei Yi'an, professor; Mao Qizhi, professor; Hao Shouyi, professor; and Hong Zaisheng, professor. The conference will be facilitated by Jame C. Jao, architect. 

The conference is FREE and open to the public but registrations are required.

This event would not be possible without our partners: CTBUH (Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat), Tianjin University, Nankai University, Tsinghua University, and Peking University.

Click the button to learn more about the conference and register!
register
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<![CDATA[2016 CTBUH conference: cities to mega cities]]>Fri, 19 Aug 2016 07:00:00 GMThttp://verticalcity.org/news/2016-ctbuh-conference-cities-to-mega-cities*partner annoucement*
CTBUH (Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat), strategic partner of Vertical City, has announced their 2016 International Conference. This year, the conference will focus on "shaping dense vertical urbanism".

Unlike their previous conferences, this year's conference spans from Shenzhen to Guangdong to Hong Kong - three China cities that have been growing rapidly and are in need of building vertically.

The conference will kick off on October 16th and will last through October 21st. For more event information and registration, please visit the official site by clicking the "GO TO CTBUH" button below.
Go to CTBUH
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<![CDATA[Függőleges városok építésén dolgozik egy kínai csapat – elbeszélgettünk velük]]>Fri, 08 Jul 2016 17:42:53 GMThttp://verticalcity.org/news/fuggoleges-varosok-epitesen-dolgozik-egy-kinai-csapat-elbeszelgettunk-veluk
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Editor note: this article is written in Hungarian language. The title says "A Team is Working on Building Vertical Cities - We Talked to Them"
Függőleges városok megépítését tervezi egy kínai csapat, akik a világ legismertebb szakértőit kérték fel ehhez. A Vertical City projekt a fenntarthatóság, hatékonyság, az emberi jólét bővítése nevében dolgozik, és bár komoly akadályok gördülnek eléjük, nem adják fel. Lapunk megkeresésére készséggel válaszoltak, elmondásuk szerint az alapító Kenneth King és a csapat egy része ült össze, hogy a felmerülő kérdéseinkre feleljenek.

Melyek azok a fő újdonságok a Vertical City projektben, amelyek a mai településektől eltérő várost hoznának létre?
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<![CDATA[The Skyward Future Of Vertical Cities]]>Wed, 27 Apr 2016 22:23:54 GMThttp://verticalcity.org/news/the-skyward-future-of-vertical-cities
by Guy Bezant
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​One factor that contributes to our changing climate is our expanding population. Increasing numbers means increasing demands for space, food and power. In response, some ingenious people contributed to writing a book about solving the problem. They called it, the Vertical City.

The concept is based on a very simple notion; that we are running out of space. By as soon as 2050, there could be as many as 10 billion people on earth, 80% of whom will be living in urban areas. When you consider how much of the total amount of land on earth is unusable, how much is needed for farming and power generation, a population of 10 billion means space would be hard to come by. The theory, then, is to build upwards, instead of outwards. Instead of sprawling cities and infrastructure and urban landscapes, you have a small number of huge skyscrapers, interconnected with one another, providing all the needs of the inhabitants.
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<![CDATA[Vertical cities could be the future of architecture]]>Sat, 23 Apr 2016 20:37:14 GMThttp://verticalcity.org/news/vertical-cities-could-be-the-future-of-architecture
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Land is becoming scarce as the world's population grows and environmental changes shrink the amount of livable space on Earth. Some creative thinkers say the solution is to build up.

A nonprofit organization called Vertical City aims to garner support for so-called vertical cities — Tetris-like arrangements of interconnected towers designed to support thousands of residents.

These proposed structures, which can be up to 400 floors, contain all the components of a city, from housing and hospitals to universities and municipal departments. Advocates claim vertical cities will save energy, support a growing population, and preserve land for food production, nature, and recreation — if we can figure out a way to build them.
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<![CDATA[Vertical City Documentary Premiers Calling for New Urban Form]]>Thu, 10 Mar 2016 02:01:07 GMThttp://verticalcity.org/news/vertical-city-documentary-premiers-calling-for-new-urban-form
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Can a vertical city model solve the problems of modern urban sprawl? Two of the loudest advocates for sky scraper cities, Ken King and Kellogg Wong, have just released a pretty convincing documentary as part of their ongoing movement. Watch it here...

As urban designers, architects and academics alike look to solve years of poor planning and ever-decreasing space in our cities, one vision for the future that pops up time and time again is the concept of a ‘vertical city’. Maximizing on space, a vertical city is a mixed use high rise building which combines all the real estate of your average town: residential, business, commercial, leisure, hospitality, food production and services. It is the direct opposite of urban sprawl, and an ultra-futuristic solution for sustainability – its proponents tend to highlight preventing the loss of green spaces and farmland and a low carbon-footprint (since all travel is vertical and there is no need for roads or vehicles) as the keys to the concept’s potential success. Two of the loudest advocates of vertical cities, architects and authors Ken King and Kellogg Wong have just premiered a short documentary, which follows their book on the same topic, with an aim of convincing the cities of the future to look up...
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<![CDATA[Video of Vertical City premieres in    New York]]>Tue, 08 Mar 2016 21:32:29 GMThttp://verticalcity.org/news/video-of-vertical-city-premieres-in-new-york
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Half a century ago the architect Paolo Soleri promoted the idea of an Arcology, “a highly integrated and compact three-dimensional urban form that is the opposite of urban sprawl with its inherently wasteful consumption of land, energy resources and time, and tendency to isolate people from each other and the community.”

Today there is a new vision that is a direct descendant: the Vertical City. Eighteen months ago TreeHugger wrote about a Kickstarter to produce a book and a video that would describe a building form that “can save energy, support our growing population and preserve our horizontal spaces for food production, nature and recreation.” The book was released recently, and the video premiered in New York City this past Friday.
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<![CDATA[A Vision Of The Vertical Cities Of The Future]]>Thu, 04 Dec 2014 23:16:12 GMThttp://verticalcity.org/news/a-vision-of-the-vertical-cities-of-the-future
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​Cities will need to be denser and taller in the future. It's the only way to accommodate a global population of 9 billion-plus people and increasing demand for urban living (70% of us could live in cities by 2050, according to some projections). The alternative is surely worse: More sprawl taking up what little green space is left.

The concept of a "vertical city," as sketched out in a new book by architects Kenneth King and Kellogg Wong, is something more than a hyper-dense Gotham, though. Yes, there are a lot of towering buildings but also parks, schools, hospitals and restaurants at upper levels, as well. Essentially, it's a vision of a complete ecosystem in the sky—a place you never have to leave if you don't want to.
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<![CDATA[Is the Vertical City a viable solution for sustainable living?]]>Fri, 07 Nov 2014 23:06:24 GMThttp://verticalcity.org/news/is-the-vertical-city-a-viable-solution-for-sustainable-living
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The concept of the Vertical City is fascinating and attractive to some people, and totally repulsive to others. In principle, living and working in a building hundreds of stories high makes a great deal of sense; it prevents the loss of farmland and natural greenbelts, it reduces air pollution (since all commuting is vertical where the distances are much shorter and the transport mechanism much more efficient) and reduces the need for all the roads that service horizontal cities, so people can just walk out into parkland. This is why I have been so fascinated with the work of 
Zhang Yue and Broad Sustainable Building and his vision of a 220 storey Sky City.

Others are deeply committed to the concept too; Authors Kenneth King and Kelogg Wong are putting together a coffee table book promoting the idea of the vertical city. They have developed an impressive 
Manifesto...
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